Mentoring Young Design Thinkers

The path to becoming an industrial designer is challenging.  There are a laundry list of skills to master to even be considered for the first professional job.  The student experience is so transformative in the individual's thought process and way of viewing the world that the discipline has been named Design Thinking.

Here at Trig, we make it a point to give back to the community whenever we can.  Seth Teeples, one of our fellow designers, absolutely loves talking to students about the professional design life.  Recently, Benjamin Bush, a professor of Industrial Design at the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD), asked Seth and his wife Laura, another practicing designer, to speak at the school.

Seth and Laura encouraged SCAD students to treat classes like meetings, to do their work between these “meetings,” and to be sure to work in leisure time after work hours are over, keeping a healthy work-life balance. In their opinion, students of design thinking should understand that they don’t have to be good at everything right from the start, nor do they have to be perfect every time. Working hard to build a strong foundation of the design process and solid understanding of design fundamentals is what they believe will set students up for success. 

The Teepleses also wanted students to know that it’s okay to ask for help.  The ability to admit what you don’t know is a hidden strength—it is the first step you take toward learning and becoming a better design thinker.

We are proud to have Seth as a member of the Trig team and have his wife as a part of the Trig family. The SCAD talk that Seth and Laura recently gave reflects the spirit of collaboration we practice here every day.  We are always happy to say that we enjoy giving back to the community, but in the end, we learn just as much from the students as they learn from us.